My Tiny Brood of Backyard Chooks

chooks, hens or chickens?

Hatching baby chicks for beginners – Lesson # 1 – Nesting area for broody

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This is  Hannah Hen sitting on her chicks just after they had just hatched. You can’t see them of course as they are all tucked away underneath her. This is what she also looked like for 21 days patiently waiting for her chicks to hatch.

The photo below was taken when I first bought this coop. This is where Hannah, Hilda and Helen Hen were all living when Hannah went broody. Hannah always laid in one of these nests at this end of the coop as they are smaller than the two nests at the other end where the bigger Barnevelders usually lay. (I moved the two Barnevelders into another coop once Hannah went broody to let her sit in peace.)

If you see on the nests below, I had made a minor change to the nesting box design by adding a piece of board to the front so that the eggs wouldn’t roll out of the nests after the chickens had laid. Thinking back now, I probably didn’t need to do that. I may not put it back in. You will notice in the photo above where Hannah is sitting, there is no front board on the nests.

I had realised close to the end of her sitting time thatI would need to remove this board. This gave me some anxious moments wondering when to take the board out. If I took it out too soon, the eggs might roll out. If I took it out too late the baby chicks won’t be able to get over it.

If I took it out while she was sitting in the nest, it might bother her and she might abandon the nest. (I was paranoid about that. As it turned out I needn’t have worried but being a first time chicken mum, that’s what we do.) She came off the nest so rarely and when she did it was only for two or three minutes and I am at work most days so I would be very lucky to see her off the nest and then even luckier to be quick enough to get the board out before she went back on.

Well, I was lucky. I was working from home the day before the first chick hatched and I happened to see her off the nest at a time when I was on my way out to listen outside the nesting box for pipping sounds. So I moved very quickly and very quietly and I managed to wriggle the board enough to get it out. Thank goodness I hadn’t screwed it in.

I have read in poultry forums where some people have left their broody hens in a nest that is high above the floor of the coop and when the chicks hatch, they fall from a great height. That is one lesson I didn’t have to learn.

So this first lesson is to think about the nest that the broody is going to spend her 20 to 22 days sitting on and make sure the nest is also suitable for her and her chicks once they have hatched. I have read since that other people have the same removable boards in front of their nesting boxes and they take them out the day before the chicks are due to hatch or the day that they hatch. However, I don’t think my very bossy broody would take too kindly to me wriggling a board in front of her as she was on her last stages of sitting.

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5 thoughts on “Hatching baby chicks for beginners – Lesson # 1 – Nesting area for broody

  1. Thanks for sharing this. My nesting boxes are fairly high off the ground. I need to rethink this.

    • If you don’t want to buy a separate coop / chicken tractor, some people move their broody to a corner of a garage or a shed. Some move them to the floor of their current coop into a corner in a box that has been tipped on it’s side or even in a kitty litter type tray.

  2. That is an outsanding broody setup. Very clean and comfortable and private.

  3. Pingback: Hatching baby chicks for beginners – Lesson # 2 – The right coop without a ramp « My Tiny Brood of Backyard Chooks

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